Remains of the Day: The Netherlands Now Has Net Neutrality The Netherlands becomes the first European country to have net neutrality, police-themed ransomware is targeting Canadian and U.S. users, and a DDOS attack brings down Ustream and Bambuser.


  • Netherlands First Country in Europe With Net Neutrality:
    Yesterday, the Netherlands adopted legislation that ensures the country’s Internet will remain open and secure, and is designed to protect users against disconnection, wiretapping without a warrant, and traffic interference via Internet providers. The Netherlands is the first country in Europe to implement net neutrality thus far. [Bits of Freedom]
  • Police-Themed Ransomware Targets U.S., Canadian Users: Ransomware known as the “Police Trojan,” a type of Trojan that originally appeared in Western Europe in 2011, is now targeting Internet users in the United States and Canada. The malware disables the functionality of a user’s PC and instructs them to pay fines via the following message: “This operating system is locked due to the violation of the federal laws of the United States of America! Following violations were detected: Your IP address was used to visit websites containing pornography, child pornography, zoophilia and child abuse. Your computer also contains video files, elements of violence and child pornography! Spam messages with terrorist motives were also sent from your computer. This computer lock is aimed to stop your illegal activity.” The user is then instructed to pay approximately $100 to be able to use their PC once more. [Computer World]
  • DDOS Attack: Ustream Down, Bambuser Under Heavy Load: Earlier this morning, Ustream and Bambuser were victims of a DDOS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack that rendered the sites unusable. Both Ustream and Bambuser confirmed these attacks later in the day, and luckily, it looks as if Livestream and Justin.tv were not affected. [GigaOM]
  • The World is Not Quite Ready for Mobile Payments, According to MasterCard: Yesterday, MasterCard release a global survey that stated the world is not quite ready for mobile payments. In its survey (entitled the Mobile Payments Readiness Index), MasterCard defined mobile payments in three categories: peer-to-peer, mobile commerce, and point of sale. It also graded mobile payments on six different factors using a scale from 0-100, which includes: Consumer Readiness, Environment, Financial Services, Infrastructure, Mobile Commerce Clusters, and Regulation. What MasterCard found was the world as a whole is not ready for mobile payments, but the world as a whole will be in the near future. [Read Write Web]
  • DVDs and Blu-rays Will Now Carry Two Unskippable Government Warnings: The United States government will begin including two copyright notices in DVD and Blu-Ray discs: one which will “warn,” and one which will “educate.” These copyright notices will be unskippable, and approximately six major movie studios will begin including the notices in their movies this week. [Ars Technica]

  • Google+: A Mobile App With Sense and Soul:
    Today, Google released a new mobile app variant of Google+ for the iPhone, designed to take advantage of the uniqueness of a smartphone and allow Google+ users to share events and information on the fly. Posted photos, text, videos, and the like will appear crisp and clear, and best of all? The app is designed to be extremely fast. [Google]

  • Introducing the App Center:
    Today, Facebook announced the App Center, a platform where individuals are able to download social apps such as Spotify, Pinterest, Flixster, and more. Every app will also have an app detail page, which will provide in-depth detail regarding the app listed. Developers also have the opportunity to list their app on the App Center as well, which will allow them to grow their app and ensure it reaches more people than ever. [Facebook]

Title image remixed from rozbyshaka (Shutterstock).